Peru Investigates the Origin of Three Objects That Fell from The Sky (And Are Not Meteorites)

The space agency believes that it could be fuel tanks of some fragmented satellite during its re-entry into the atmosphere.

A team of specialists has moved to an interior zone in the Peruvian Amazon to try to clarify the origin of three objects found in the Puno region, after the inhabitants reported seeing an incandescent object. Peru investigates the origin of these three objects that fell from the sky (and are not meteorites). 

Some local Peruvian media have echoed the testimonies of the sighting of a fireball in the sky from Pucallpa to Tingo María last weekend of what they thought was a meteorite, but was it?

The objects fell on Saturday in the community of Larancahuani, in the province of Azángaro, in the Puno region, more than 1,000 kilometers from the places where the sightings were reported. So, the Space Agency of Peru believes that its entry path was from east to west. As a precautionary measure, Peru has cordoned off the area and recommends that nobody approach or manipulate the objects until it is clear what it is, although it has already ruled out that it is a meteorite.

The agency reported that it is about three circular objects probably of metal, which have been isolated to analyze their composition and determine if there is a risk to the health of the inhabitants of the region. Conida believes that it is "fuel tanks of some satellite or satellite launcher, which has been fragmented during its re-entry into the atmosphere," it said in a statement.

A group of scientists has analyzed the pieces found in the place, before being transferred to Lima to the facilities of the space agency for an in-depth analysis. The space agency explains that when the satellites complete their useful life, they are usually taken to a lower orbit so that they enter the Earth in a controlled manner and disintegrate.