Poudre High School alum, the NASA space traveler Serena Auñón-Chancellor preparing to go to International Space Station

It's far from Fort Collins to International Space Station around 250 vertical miles if Earth-orbiting, multinational science test were stopped straightforwardly over the northern Colorado city. On June 6th, Poudre High School alumna, namely Serena Auñón-Chancellor is going to head skyward and, after two days, finish a trip that has had a couple of striking stops since she graduated in the year 1993. 

Auñón-Chancellor is currently a doctor with a college degree in engineering. She initially came to the NASA agency in 2006 as a flight specialist giving therapeutic care and counsel to space explorers starting from the earliest stage being chosen to be a part of the office's twentieth space traveler class in 2009. She and her team individuals, the European Space Agency's Alexander Gerst and Prokopyev of Russia's Roscosmos space program did leave Russia on May 19 for their dispatch site in Kazakhstan. They are going to burn through a half year on board the space station before coming back to Earth in December, as per NASA. 

"You're entirely energized. My team simply completed our last test of the years in Russia. It got to be a major help to ensuring they got over with," Auñón-Chancellor said as of late from Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center located in Star City, Russia. "You nearly start to get your amusement look on. Our dispatch vehicle will be on cushion." Auñón-Chancellor will accomplish more than fill in as the group's main wellspring of medicinal care while on board the space station. She is going to partake in an assortment of tests, incorporating examining how time in space influences human bones and the bone cells, and this could mean for the treatment of osteoporosis. 

"There truly is nobody territory that we will center around specifically as a result of the many investigations going ahead on the ISS," she said. "Truly, we'll be taking a look at each part of human body as much as possible, and also designing and material science." Auñón-Chancellor's space-bound gear incorporates no less than two moments from Fort Collins: which is a banner and also a T-shirt from her place of graduation, Poudre High. The things were sent to her as a student at the school after instructor Tim Lenczycki saw her highlighted in an IMAX motion picture at Florida's Kennedy Space Center and connected using email. Auñón-Chancellor was a student of Lenczycki, in material science and propelled situation physical science in the mid-1990s. 

"She was exceptionally objective situated," Lenczycki reviewed. "She even knew in those days that she needed to be a space explorer. She was pondering med school. However, her definitive objective was to be a space traveler."