Science Fiction, no this is space fiction

Adrift, a book by Rob Boffard has brought the book lovers to the store once again. The plot is set in the outer space, and looks likes a castaway tale. The title is familiar to another novel which has been transformed into a movie too. On June 05, 2018 this book has been inaugurated and sent out to stores. Just as always assumptions were made of what kind of a book it would be. The story is about ‘Red Panda’ a spaceship where most of the action takes place. The story revolved around a group of people who are strangers, and who gets stuck in the space. The escape is what excites the reader. We have seen the somewhat same plot in movies like Final Destination, Alfred Hitchcock, etc. but the treatment to the situation is wholly explored and explained. 

Hannah Elliott performs the starring role of a recent college graduate in History. She gets a job of giving historical tours at a resort in a distant galaxy. She is not much inclined towards her role but has no choice. Her situation is entirely relatable, though a distant galaxy is not. The position is like a typical workplace like we have tourists on earth, she is guiding tourists in space. The first day at work is terrible as she gets late as she forgets her eye-a-lens computer, something everyone in the Adrift wears. In this universe, she finally makes it to Red panda and finds that the tourists are in a bad mood. A war-hardened Russian pilot flies the spacecraft and Hannah guides the passengers. This regular looking tour would have a twist. The wings changed into something they never anticipated. The passengers were of different age groups and got separated from each other. The astonishing part is you cannot understand any character or conclude how they are going to react.

The characters take a turn in playing the protagonist. The beauty of author is in the manner how he allows the reader to change the perspective almost immediately. There is murder and redemption and drama on the ship. There are stretched open wormholes through which people jump, and in between all the fiction, there are elements of the real world too. The difficulties of wearing a spacesuit and that of a spacewalk, everything is justly presented. The possibility of an escape vanishes every time you see some hope. The wait for the last page is just and worthy.