SpaceX and Others Create a Stiffer Competitive Atmosphere for Launch Contracts as Space Flights for Human Draw Near

The Pentagon, for about ten years, has relied solely on United Launch Alliance for satellites’ launching in space. The collaboration of Boeing and Lockheed Martin monopolized the lucrative market of launches until Elon Mask and his company SpaceX filed a suit to exercise his right to bid for launch contracts a couple of years ago. Currently, there are two new companies with millions of dollars’ worth under their names have ventured into rocket building, and there is a high possibility that these two will likewise vie for launch contracts.

Jeffrey P. Bezos’ Blue Origin and Orbital ATK are now among those companies eyeing launch contacts together with United Launch Alliance and SpaceX.  Bezos founded this company that builds rockets, and he also owns The Washington Post, while Orbital ATK isn’t exactly new to the industry as it already launched cargo for NASA’s International Space Station on top of business deals with Pentagon. SpaceX led an effort in lowering the cost of space launch causing the market to experience its disruption period. According to Bob Smith-SEO of Blue Origin, he thinks what has been being not a good future’s predictor, and the same goes for the market of a commercial satellite.

Aside from the competition for launches in national security, Blue Origin is up against the company Virgin Galactic in the hopes that one of them can bring tourists out in space for a cost. Richard Branson and Virgin Galactic have been eyeing unto this prospect of turning an ordinary citizen into an astronaut for a hefty price of the $250,000per ticket. The SpaceShipTwo, one of the company’s flagships, passed a significant milestone when it teared the skies at almost Mach 2 and lighted the engines in flight for the first time early this April 2018. He expressed his desire to start the milestone of flying his customers the soonest time possible this year.

With ULA’s new rocker, Vulcan, Blue Jet is likewise competing against Aerojet Rocketdyne in supplying Vulcan’s engine. Both companies are claiming a good deal is now in order, but until the contract is signed, there is no saying as to which company will be able to seal the deal. As of this time, Tory Bruno-CEO of ULA has this to say regarding the matter when asked, “Soon.” Until then, competitors are now dealing with a competition that has reached a new level.