Tropical Cyclone 13P aka Linda has lost an ‘arm’ reveals NASA’s Terra satellite

 

NASA has revealed through its satellite data that the Tropical Cyclone 13P, which has been renamed Linda, has lost its 'arm' in a matter of hours after it was formed.

The cyclone in the Southern Pacific Ocean was analyzed by NASA Aqua and Terra satellites in infrared light, to determine that there were powerful storms around Linda's center and in a strong band of thunderstorms east of the center. Linda is expected to continue moving under increasing adverse conditions, so the storm is expected to dissipate by March 15.

Through infrared analysis scientists can tell cloud top temperatures that give clues about the location of the highest, coldest and strongest storms.

On March 12 at 11:05 p.m. EDT (March 13 at 0305 UTC), infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, or AIRS, instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite found the strongest storms in Linda. AIRS data showed powerful storms around Linda's center and in a strong band of thunderstorms east of the center.

By 8:30 a.m. EDT (1230 UTC) the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS, instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided an infrared look at Tropical Storm Linda's cloud top temperatures. The MODIS image showed that the once-strong band of thunderstorms east of Linda's center had weakened and fragmented.

MODIS data also found cloud top temperatures of strongest thunderstorms were as cold as or colder than minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 62.2 Celsius) around the center of circulation. The center was located over the open waters of the South Pacific. Cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted on March 13 at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC) when the center was located near 21.1 degrees south latitude and 158.9 degrees east longitude, about 397 nautical miles west-northwest of Noumea, New Caledonia. Linda had maximum sustained winds near 46 mph (40 knots/74 kph) and it was moving to the south-southwest at 19.5 mph (17 knots/31.4 kph).

The Joint Typhoon Warning Center noted that Linda is being affected by northerly vertical wind shear, pushing clouds south of center. Linda is moving south-southwest along the western edge of subtropical ridge (an elongated area of high pressure), which is located to the east-southeast of the tropical storm.